• How does the Jacobs Exhaust Brake work and why do only diesel engines use them?
• Are fuel or oil additives recommended for use with the Cummins 24-Valve Turbo Diesel?
• I have a diesel engine in my truck. Can you convert it to a natural gas engine for me or sell me a conversion kit?
• How Do I Interpret The Cummins Engine Names (i.e. ISX, ISL, QSX15)
• Why Buy A Diesel?
• How long will it take before my vehicle can be worked on?
• Do you have a towing service?
 
How does the Jacobs Exhaust Brake work and why do only diesel engines use them?

A diesel engine, unlike a gasoline engine, has no intake throttle plate. When the truck is coasting and there is no fueling in the cylinders, a diesel engine with no exhaust brake produces less retarding (slowing) power than does a gasoline engine. By adding a Jacobs Exhaust Brake, restriction is created in the exhaust system during the coasting condition. This increases pressure in the exhaust manifold, slowing the pistons during the exhaust cycle when the exhaust valves are open. This produces improved retarding power that helps slow the vehicle. The Jacobs Exhaust Brake is actually superior in performance to an intake throttle in a gasoline engine. An intake throttle produces vacuum in the cylinder during the intake stroke, which can reach a maximum level of about 14 psi. The Jacobs Exhaust Brake produces a backpressure somewhere in the neighborhood of 60 psi, resulting in enhanced retarding power.

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Are fuel or oil additives recommended for use with the Cummins 24-Valve Turbo Diesel?

Fuel or oil additives are not necessary on the 24-valve engine, provided factory recommended oil and fuel specifications are followed. Consult your owner's manual for proper guidelines. 

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I have a diesel engine in my truck. Can you convert it to a natural gas engine for me or sell me a conversion kit?

Cummins Westport manufactures and markets factory built dedicated natural gas and liquid propane gas engines that meet or exceed current EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) emissions standards. Our engines are based on the proven line of Cummins engine products, built to provide power, reliability and performance. We do not offer conversions.

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How Do I Interpret The Cummins Engine Names (i.e. ISX, ISL, QSX15)

Engine Series

IS = Interact System (i.e. ISX, ISB)
Q/QS = Signifies that an industrial engine is electronically controlled. QS stands for QUANTUM SYSTEM CONTROLS
B = B series engine line, includes 3.3 , 3.9, 4.5 and 5.9 liter engines. Offered in both fully mechanical and electronic models. 5.9 liter engine is available in both industrial and automotive versions.
C = C series engine line, includes only 8.3 liter engines. Offered in both fully mechanical and electronic models, industrial and automotive versions available.
E = On older engine models this meant the engine was electronic. EXAMPLE: K2000E
K = K series engine line, includes 19, 23, 38, 45, 50 and 60 liter engine models.
L = L series engine line, includes older 10 liter and current 9 liter engine models. Industrial and automotive versions available.
M = M series engine line, includes M11, 11 liter engines only. Industrial and automotive versions available.
N = N series engine line, no longer being produced for U.S. market. Included NTA855 and N14 engine series. Industrial and automotive versions available.
T = T series engine line such as the QST30.
X = X series engine line, includes 15 liter engines only. Industrial and automotive versions available.

Engine Technology

If a number comes first in the engine name it represents the number of cylinders (i.e. 4BTAA3.9)
3.3, 3.9, 4.5 and 5.9 = Liters of the engine
A = Water aftercooled. Will always be written as TA after the number of cylinders and an engine model letter. EXAMPLE: 4BTA3.9-P110
AA = Air to air after cooling AKA charge air cooling. EXAMPLE: 4BTAA3.9-P110
NA = Naturally aspirated
T = Turbo in any mechanically controlled engine (A-6CTAA8.3). On the QST30 the T is the actual engine model.
I/IS = Signifies that an automotive engine is also electronically controlled. The "I" was adopted to represent all versions of automotive electronic controls.

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Why Buy A Diesel?

Performance

Torque: The ISB typically has over 60% more torque capability than the gas alternative (Max 660 lb.-ft). The ISC typically has over 120% greater torque capability than the gas alternative (Max 1050 lb.-ft).

Horsepower at Altitude: Turbocharged Diesels are rated at 10,000 ft with no loss of power. Typical gas engines will lose 3% of power every 1000 ft in altitude. (E.g. a 290 hp has would deliver only about 200hp at 10,000ft, while a C8.3 300hp engine would still deliver 300hp)

Fuel Economy: Diesel engines typically get 50-100% better fuel mileage than gasoline engines due to lower engine speeds, high compression ratio, advanced combustion technology, and the higher energy content of diesel fuel vs. gasoline.

Exhaust Brake Capability: Exhaust brakes provide improved braking capability, improved safety, and lower maintenance costs. Not used with gas engines due to much lower compression ratios.

Durability

Advanced diesel technology makes a diesel engine last up to 3 times as long as comparable gas engines due to:

• Lower piston speeds
• Larger bearing surfaces
• Piston Cooling
• Gear driven camshaft instead of chain driven
• Internal Engine Oil Cooler
• Up to 50% Fewer External Parts


Examples:
ISB is rated up to 52,000 lbs. GVW with a projected life-to-overhaul of 400,000 miles.
ISC is rated up to 80,000 lbs. GVW with a projected life-to-overhaul of 500,000 miles.

Diesel…a powerful advantage over gasoline

First, consider the two key factors for judging engine performance…horsepower and torque.

Horsepower determines how fast your vehicle can go, and how well it handles the hills. Torque, measured in pound-feet (lb-ft), determines how quickly your vehicle accelerates from a stop or passes another vehicle. Put simply, torque is what gets you going, and horsepower is what keeps you going…down the road.

Compared to a gasoline engine, a Cummins diesel engine will deliver peak torque quicker, for superior pulling power…especially when towing. And that’s just one reason why a Cummins diesel engine is the power of choice in hardworking vehicles.

At 230 horsepower, a gasoline engine delivers only 390 lb.-ft of torque. But a Cummins B5.9 engine at 230 horsepower really flexes its muscle with 605 lb-ft of torque. And for even greater power, Cummins C8.3 diesel engines are available up to 350 horsepower with 1050 lb.-ft of torque. That’s the kind of strength you can really feel working for you.

Easier Maintenance

Cummins engines have a simpler, more efficient design than gasoline engines. They have fewer parts, which means less to go wrong. In fact, Cummins diesels require fewer oil changes and maintenance intervals than gasoline engines. Over the life of your diesel, your maintenance frequency will be 40-50% less than gasoline engines. In short, you’ll spend more time on the road, and less time in the shop.

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How long will it take before my vehicle can be worked on?

With our Cummins QuickServe, qualifying in-shop repairs with a standard repair time of four hours or less will be completed the same business day.

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Do you have a towing service?

We work with local tow truck services and can arrange for any necessary towing of your vehicle.

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